February 10, 2011

Battle cry

There's something that you hear people scream when making some sort of attack. Sakamoto shouts it in the second episode of Strike Witches 2, and later in that same episode Barkhorn does the same. And I've heard it in other shows, too.

It sounds like arie. Does it mean something?

Well, あり得ない arienai means "impossible". But arie isn't a word. Still, I wonder if it's a back formation that implies "possible" and thus the scream means "I can do this!"

Does that make any sense?

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 09:22 PM | Comments (4) | Add Comment
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December 16, 2010

No matter what it is, someone's got a fetish for it

Via Ace, here are NSFW pictures from inside a Japanese brothel. There are no people in them, but the anime room includes nudity. And there are a couple of bondo rooms.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 06:53 PM | Comments (2) | Add Comment
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November 19, 2010

Yaba!

The dictionary says that yabai is a young person's slang meaning "oh, crap!"

I haven't heard that. But I keep hearing yaba to mean that. For instance, Nagi says it in the last episode of Mai Otome just before he's captured (about 18:55). And Kuroko says it in the first episode of To Aru Kagaku no Railgun when Mikoto reaches over the table to taken away the little book in which Kuroko had written her seduction plan (at about 12:30).

Is it a contraction of yabai? Or is yaba something else which I haven't been able to find in the dictionary?

UPDATE: By the way, speaking of the last episode of Mai Otome,

/images/04375.jpg

Wowsah!

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 10:21 AM | Comments (19) | Add Comment
Post contains 115 words, total size 1 kb.

November 11, 2010

What does "-chi" mean?

In Asobi ni Iku Yo, Manami calls Kio "Kio-chi". Chaika picks it up from her and does it too

In the second episode of Nanoha StrikerS, during the flashback scene to the airport fire, a random magical grunt calls Hayate "Yagami-chi". Hayate is an S+ ranked magician, as well as being commissioned as a Captain in the ground forces. She'd have been 15 or 16 at the time.

What does -chi mean as an honorific? I don't think I've ever run into it anywhere else.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 04:34 PM | Comments (13) | Add Comment
Post contains 89 words, total size 1 kb.

September 24, 2010

Namatta na

At the end of ep 1 of Strike Witches 2, at 21:48 (in my copy) Miyafuji has just gotten through complaining about a week on the Emily flying boat, and Sakamoto says namatta na, Miyafuji. Which embarasses Miyafuji and makes her sit up and blush.

The sub I've got translates it as "You've gotten soft, Miyafuji." But that seems to be a case of taking liberties. Unfortunately, I can't figure out what she really said.

It's the past tense of a verb. That I do know. It might be "nameru" "to experience something bad" but that doesn't seem right. Anyone care to help me out here? What was it?

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 10:32 AM | Comments (2) | Add Comment
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September 19, 2010

A new word

Today's word is punimune.

"Puni" comes from the onomatopoeia punipuni which means "squishy". "Mune" means "chest" but in colloquial use it refers to women's breasts.

A "punimune" turns out to be one of those lumpy mouse pads, with gel inserts. Like this one, of Eris:

/images/04255.jpg

Every once in a while I see one of these and think, "I ought to get one, just for kitsch value." Then I think, "Naah, if I do then it'll mean I've gone completely around the bend."

UPDATE: Ye gods. Well, I must have, because I just put in the order. I would have preferred Manami, but Eris will have to do.

Man, how pathetic.

UPDATE: By the way, the first BD of Asobi ni Iku Yo came out last week, and I'm downloading it now.

UPDATE: Actually, it may be a new word. Searching Amazon JP for ぷにむね only comes up with 4 hits. I think the previous "oppai mouse pads" used rubber for the lumps instead of "PVC gel", which is what CDJapan said this one was filled with.

I wonder if I've made a terrible mistake here.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 09:38 AM | Comments (9) | Add Comment
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August 24, 2010

Chaos

Hmmm...

乱麻 means "chaos". It's pronounced ranma. Hmmm...

The TV series spelled "Ranma" in hiragana, not with kanji.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 10:28 PM | Comments (3) | Add Comment
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August 22, 2010

Washinomiya shrine

The Brickmuppet has visited the Washinomiya Shinto shrine, and has posted lots of pictures.

It reminds me of the castle in Scotland where much of "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" was filmed. 30 years on, that turns out to be the main reason tourists visit the place, and the gift-shop at the castle is loaded up with Monty Python memorabilia.

For those folks, at least, it isn't a curse. It's the difference between financial survival and collapse. Still, it ain't quite what they were hoping for.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in linky at 08:00 PM | Comments (3) | Add Comment
Post contains 17 words, total size 1 kb.

August 15, 2010

Hayate's accent

Something that's bothered me ever since the first time I finished watching Nanoha StrikerS is that there's something odd about the way Hayate speaks. It's like a lilt or an accent, but I can't tell what it is.

I just now identified one specific thing: she sometimes tacks a ya sound onto the end of her sentences. For instance, in one case she ended a sentence as kaya which I think was the ka particle plus her ya. In another case she said onegaiya.

It doesn't make sense in story terms for it to be a regionalism, since Nanoha doesn't do it and they grew up in the same city. (But that doesn't mean it isn't one.) It isn't Ueda Kana's native accent; I've never heard her do it in any other role I've liistened to.

Usually when these kinds of things are present there's a reason why. It's something that the writers are using to indicate a stereotype. Is that what's going on in this case? If so, what stereotype?

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 05:41 PM | Comments (4) | Add Comment
Post contains 173 words, total size 1 kb.

August 04, 2010

An idiom?

There's something I keep hearing and I'm having a hard time parsing it. It translates as "I know!"

One example of it is in DBK ep 56 at 11:22. Frieza says something that sounds to my untrained ear as wakatteryo. But there isn't any such verb tense AFAIK.

What I'm wondering is if it's wakatte aru and that it's become an idiom and been subject to pronunciation drift. Is that what I'm hearing?

UPDATE: While we're on the subject, there's another one. This appears in DBK 57 at 11:40. It's Trunks and it's translated as "Please excuse me!"

It sounds like shideshimasu. -masu is the polite ending, but I can't figure out the base verb that's being conjugated here. (It could be sudeshimasu that I'm hearing.) It's another idiom, whatever it is; it happens all the time.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Japanese at 08:29 AM | Comments (10) | Add Comment
Post contains 139 words, total size 1 kb.

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