April 11, 2015

Nanoha Vivid -- Engineer's disease

Just a small problem here. This is Vivio:

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And that was the person in ancient Belka from whom Vivio was cloned, recognizably so because they both have exactly the same Heterochromia.

And that's the problem: heterochromia isn't heritable. It isn't caused by a gene. The most common cause of heterochromia is chimericism, which happens when two fertilized eggs merge and result in a single individual.

If you take a single cell from someone with heterochromia and clone it, the resulting baby's eyes will be the same color, one of the two the parent had. (Which one depends on where the cell came from.)

Not that it matters, except that it's a plot point in Nanoha Vivid -- or it will be. Einhart is going to recognize Vivio by her eyes.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 03:09 PM | Comments (9) | Add Comment
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March 11, 2015

Knives

I'm a big fan of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe stories. Just about the only mystery series (after Sherlock Holmes) I've ever really read much of.

For a long time I didn't have access to them, but when I got my Kindle it turned out that the entire canon was available for it, so I've bought and downloaded most of it, at least three quarters.

Recently I noticed something that's been bothering me -- more than it really should. In several of the stories, someone dies by being stabbed, and dies without making any sound.

That's not really possible. A stab wound can kill you fairy rapidly if it hits the heart, but you'll still scream. The classic knife-kill they teach soldiers is to get the victim from behind, to grab his head with one hand over the mouth, and to shove the knife in to hit the heart.

But that's not what happens in these stories. In at least one case the person was stabbed from the front, and she should have thrashed like a fish from the pain -- but didn't. In another case it's described as a woman walking by a man from his rear to his front, and sticking a knife in him in passing. Other people were nearby and would have heard if he'd made any kind of sound, including even falling on the floor, and they didn't.

Knifes don't act like that! Grumble...

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 09:00 PM | Comments (10) | Add Comment
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January 23, 2015

To Aru Kagaku no Railgun S -- engineer's disease

There are two major screwups in Railgun S which have always bothered me. They're both spoilers, so below the fold they go.

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more...

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 11:05 AM | Comments (11) | Add Comment
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January 22, 2015

What's wrong with this picture?

"She's beautiful enough -- in her way -- of course," the man admitted, entirely unimpressed. "But the, so is a Radelegian cateagle, so is a spire of frozen helium, and so is a six-foot-long armor-piercing punch." -- Second Stage Lensman, E. E. Smith

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 10:35 PM | Comments (7) | Add Comment
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January 02, 2015

Non-optimal solutions

I eat my peas with honey.
I've done it all my life.
It makes the peas taste funny,
but it keeps them on my knife.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 10:27 AM | Comments (2) | Add Comment
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December 09, 2014

I've discovered a new Illuminati!

I think I know the truth about the recent hysteria regarding campus rape. It's...

Fat YAOI fangirls!

Their sinister plot is to make it so terrifying and risky to be a heterosexual male that all the guys will give up on women and turn to each other for comfort. And then the Fat YAOI fangirls will have achieved in the real world the fantasy they had been reading about!

Explains a lot, doesn't it?

UPDATE: I assume most of my readers know this, but やおい yaoi is a Japanese acronym for yama nashi, ochi nashi, imi nashi which means "no climax, no point, no meaning". So even the Japanese are contemptuous of it. What is it? It's the term for mangas about male homosexuals, aka "boy's love". And in Japan the main audience for yaoi is middle-aged married women. In America the stereotype is that it's girls in their teens and twenties who are overweight, hence "fat YAOI fangirls". As a group they're known for wandering around anime conventions carrying YAOI paddles, and quite frankly I don't want to know why.

Every group of freaky fans has someone they look down on ("Yeah, we're strange, but those guys are really strange!"), and for most otaku it would be furries. But I think even furries look down on fat YAOI fangirls. 

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 01:13 PM | Comments (8) | Add Comment
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May 05, 2014

Dog Days -- speculation

What happened to all their parents? Doesn't it seem strange that all three kingdoms are currently ruled by teenage (or preteen) princesses? Where did the adults all go?

Standing outside, maybe it's just a case of Everything is Better with Princesses. But in story terms, is it inexplicable or is it a plot point?

more...

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 09:04 AM | Comments (6) | Add Comment
Post contains 252 words, total size 2 kb.

March 26, 2014

To aru kagaku no Refrigerator

I've been watching Railgun S all the way through, and I just spotted a huge logic fail. Below the fold, of course.

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Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 08:41 AM | Comments (6) | Add Comment
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January 15, 2014

Mouretsu Refrigerator

It's taken a long time and many rewatches of Mouretsu Pirates for me to start spotting logic errors in the show. One in particular, which is a spoiler, below the fold.

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Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 10:20 AM | Comments (3) | Add Comment
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January 09, 2014

How an engineer looks at the world

When I look at this, the first thing that springs to mind is "mosquitos".

Venice is famous for its canals, but there's a downside to it all. Venice is built in a lagoon, and the water doesn't flush. Another thing Venice is notorious for (besides flooding) is insect plagues. Insects breed in the lagoon, and sometimes they swarm. It is so dense that it shrouds the city in darkness.

I've visited Amsterdam, which also is famous for canals. However, the Dutch, being superlative civil engineers, have their situation under control. The entire canal system is controlled by a set of gates, and the city engineers flush the water in the canals six times per week with water from the Amstel river. As a result, the water in the canals doesn't reek and they don't get insect plagues.

And the owners of this merry little chateau are going to have to do something to keep the water in their little lake from getting putrid and loaded with insect larva. I wonder how they do it?

50 gallons of Clorox every Sunday?

Or a different possibility: 5,000 Koi?

Posted by: Steven Den Beste in Engineer's Disease at 10:34 PM | Comments (3) | Add Comment
Post contains 193 words, total size 1 kb.

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