July 24, 2016

Is it summer yet?

Everytime I visit the US Weather Bureau web site I see all kinds of warnings about hot weather in the midWest and NE.

It sure hasn't happened here; it's felt like late March for the last month or so: overcast with intermittent rain and highs in the upper 60's. Last couple of days we finally got into April. (It's supposed to hit 85 today.) The problem is the jet stream has been south of us:

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So while all of you are getting your weather blowing north from Mexico and the Caribbean, our weather has been coming down from Alaska.

About a month and a half ago we got 3 days of scorching heat. Well, "scorching" for us anyway; highs in the upper 90's. But then the weather turned cold and it's been cold ever since. I even had to turn on my apartment heat one time.

Oh, well; such is life.

I've become addicted to Haifuri. I've watched it something like 5 times now, and it just keeps getting better. The blatant idiocy of the concept is still evident but the characters are growing on me, and damn it can get exciting during the combat sequences.

A good sign that a series has gotten under my skin is when I start thinking "What comes next?" after the show is over, and so:

Also, it isn't a fan-service show, but they did give us a little.

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When I watch some of the battle scenes which involved larger ships, one thing I noticed is about the ships with 3-gun turrets like Graf Spee and Musashi: when they fire the guns don't all fire at once; they go bababoom.

Is that historically accurate? I've never seen anything like that before. I've seen film of American battleships firing at night and it looked to me like all three barrels fired simultaneously.

Staggered firing would make sense in terms of reducing wear on the turret bearing. Staggered firing would reduce gunnery accuracy by spreading the shells out. Which would be considered more important? In this show we see it from Hiei, Musashi, and Graf Spee, so they're making it both Japanese and German ships doing that.

UPDATE: Another thing that took me a long time to notice:


Posted by: Steven Den Beste in General Anime at 12:16 PM | Comments (8) | Add Comment
Post contains 227 words, total size 5 kb.

1 I know that, in a smaller craft, you can pull water out if the travel  speed is fast enough and the hole is away from the towing direction. Don't ask me how I know this.

What is interesting for me about this series is, usually, the ideas and the start are good, but the ending is a disappointment. Here, I thought the ending was superb and it seemed to get better as it got closer to the finale.

Posted by: topmaker at July 24, 2016 01:44 PM (6stZH)

2

I don't think the hull had been holed, quite. At the very end, all the stresses finally paid off and something failed -- and a failure like that often cascades, which is why it started taking water and went down.

As to "pulling water out" that's a straight reading of the Bernoulli principle.

The series started getting better A lesser director would have tried to keep that going all the way to the end and it would have sucked. As it was, they and that's when the story started to improve.

Posted by: Steven Den Beste at July 24, 2016 01:57 PM (+rSRq)

3 Anyway, I think the reason

Posted by: Steven Den Beste at July 24, 2016 02:00 PM (+rSRq)

4 It's a bit chilly here in Kansas today. The temperature only got to 101°F this afternoon. Want to trade climates?

Posted by: Don at July 24, 2016 02:28 PM (R8iLy)

5

When I watch some of the battle scenes which involved larger ships, one thing I noticed is about the ships with 3-gun turrets like Graf Spee and Musashi: when they fire the guns don't all fire at once; they go bababoom.

Is that historically accurate? I've never seen anything like that before.

Yes.  For reasons of gunnery and limitations of space, triple and three gun turrets had delay coils which would stagger the firings of different guns in the turret a fraction of a second.

I've seen film of American battleships firing at night and it looked to me like all three barrels fired simultaneously.

The delay coils stagger the firing of the individual guns by a fraction of a second - the practice that eventually evolved in the USN was the outer guns on a triple/three gun turret would fire together, followed by the middle.  From an observer's standpoint, you would have to look carefully for the delay in the guns to notice, though seeing the shells in flight would make it obvious.

Staggered firing would make sense in terms of reducing wear on the turret bearing. Staggered firing would reduce gunnery accuracy by spreading the shells out.

The former does not appeared to be much of a concern within the US Navy, and the latter is actually the reverse - staggering the firings would increase gunnery accuracy (By reducing the number of 'shorts,' which could reach as high as 10%.) due to reducing the drag affecting the shells in flight from either the disturbed air caused by shells traveling at slightly different speeds, or the muzzle blast itself.  A less common concern was shells from the same salvo actually touching in-flight.

Delay coils were not the only solution but since increasing the distance spread on the guns in a turret would raise weight and size concerns - and the coils weighed nothing next to that - they were the usual choice.

Posted by: cxt217 at July 24, 2016 03:12 PM (n923J)

6 It was a pleasant 75F here in Sydney on Friday, before the weather check the calendar and corrected itself.

Posted by: Pixy Misa at July 24, 2016 09:54 PM (PiXy!)

7 I'm looking at a high of 64 today, while 20 miles up the road they're getting 81. Microclimates are wonderful things.

-j

Posted by: J Greely at July 25, 2016 11:23 AM (ZlYZd)

8 cxt217: "Delay coils were not the only solution but since increasing the distance spread on the guns in a turret would raise weight and size concerns - and the coils weighed nothing next to that - they were the usual choice. "

It didn't help that the Iowa's design teams didn't communicate with each other, and the group that designed the barbettes to support the turrets sized them to fit the ship, not the standard Mod 6/.50cal 16" guns in triple mounts. The weapons designers had to modify the guns and invent the Mod 7 in order to fit them in the smaller turret.

Posted by: ubu at July 26, 2016 06:35 AM (SlLGE)

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